Thursday, 31 December 2020

♡Jaffareadstoo's Favourite Reads of the Year 2020 ♡

 



This year has been such a challenge and more than at any other time in my life I have found an escape from the worries of reality by escaping into an imagined world.

As a book blogger I am in an extremely privileged position of being able to read the most amazing books long before they are published and it has been my delight in sharing these books this year on Jaffareadstoo. Having read over 240 fabulous books, it's been really difficult to whittle the list down to a manageable 30 otherwise this list would have been as long as a sheet of wallpaper!

To all these fabulous authors ♡THANK YOU ♡for sharing the gift of your imagination in this difficult year and for giving me such wonderful stories, and to all the hard working publishers who continue to support Jaffareadstoo with such enthusiasm.

And especial thanks to the book blogging community of A Bunch of Book Bloggers and Book Connectors on Facebook whose posts keep me sane in an often complicated world and for all the likes and shares on social media.
 


In No Particular Order








©Jaffareadstoo 2020

Wednesday, 30 December 2020

πŸ“– My 12 in 12 in 2020 πŸ“–

 

πŸ“– As the end of my reading year approaches here are my much anticipated 12 in 12 πŸ“–




Thanks to Jo at 
The Book Jotter who  inspired this meme...



πŸ“– Twelve authors who were new to me:

  1. Jeannine Cumins - American Dirt
  2. Ann Napolitano - Dear Edward
  3. Therese Ann Fowler - A Good Neighbourhood
  4. Catherine Jinks - Shepherd
  5. Jack Shepherd - Back to School
  6. Kathleen McGurl - The Secrets of the Chateau
  7. Miranda Mallins - The Puritan Princess
  8. Jennifer Bohnet - A French Affair
  9. Rebecca Marsh - Where Hope is Found
  10. Louise Allen - The Maiden and the Mercenary
  11. Naomi Miller - Imperfect Alchemist
  12. Susanna Bavin - The Deserter's Daughter


πŸ“– Twelve authors I have read before:

  1. Dorothy Koomson - Tell Me Your Secret
  2. Claire Allan - The Liar's Daughter
  3. Linda Green - One Moment
  4. Lorna Cook - The Forbidden Promise
  5. Hazel Gaynor - The Bird in the Bamboo Cage 
  6. Celia Rees - Miss Graham's Cookbook
  7. Carolyn Kirby - When We Fall
  8. Debbie Rix - The Italian Girls
  9. Liza Perrat - The Last Blackbird
  10. Amanda Brookfield - The Other Woman
  11. Susan Lewis - Forgive Me
  12. Rosie Goodwin - The Winter Promise


πŸ“– Twelve books from authors I know will never let me down:

  1. The Dilemma - B A Paris 
  2. The Home - Sarah Stovell  
  3. The Lantern Men - Elly Griffiths 
  4. The Lost Lights of St Kilda - Elisabeth Gifford 
  5. The Secrets of Ironbridge - Mollie Walton
  6. A Ration Book Wedding - Jean Fullerton
  7. Up Close and Personal - Kathryn Freeman
  8. The Light Within Us - Charlotte Betts
  9. A Walk Along the Beach - Debbie Macomber
  10. The Last Blackbird - Liza Perrat
  11. Endless Skies - Jane Cable
  12. The Cornish Betrothal - Nicola Pryce

πŸ“– Twelve Audio Books I have enjoyed listening to:

  1. The Clan of the Cave Bear - Jean M. Auel
  2. Wolf Hall - Hilary Mantel
  3. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone - J K Rowling
  4. Doomsday Book - Connie Willis
  5. Forever Amber - Kathleen Winsor
  6. Red Desert - Paddy Magrane
  7. Bleak House - Charles Dickens
  8. 20/20 - Carl Goodman
  9. Where the Crawdads Sing - Delia Owens
  10. Pillars of the Earth - Ken Follett
  11. The Crimson Petal and the White - Michel Faber
  12. A Christmas Carol - Charles Dickens

πŸ“– Twelve books that surprised me.....in a good way:

  1. Under the Stars - Matt Gaw
  2. Just Another Mountain - Sarah Jane Douglas
  3. The Lost Child - Emily Gunnis
  4. Cabinet of Comfort - Paul Anthony Jones
  5. The Weight of Small Things - Julie Lancaster
  6. The Unwinding - Jackie Morris
  7. The Joyful Environmentalist - Isabel Losada
  8. Scottish Words - Robin A Crawford
  9. Year of Living Simply - Kate Humble
  10. Wintering - Stephen Rutt
  11. The Secret Life of the Savoy - Olivia Williams
  12. Fifty words for Snow - Nancy Campbell

πŸ“– Twelve books that took me by the hand and led me into the past:

  1. Lady of the Ravens - Joanna Hickson
  2. The Foundling - Stacey Halls
  3. Echoes of the Runes - Christina Courtney
  4. The Book of Longings - Sue Monk Kidd
  5. The Silken Rose - Carol McGrath
  6. The Mysterious Miss Fairchild - Sarah Mallory
  7. A Single Thread - Tracy Chevalier
  8. The Servant - Maggie Richell-Davies
  9. The Honey and the Sting - E C Fremantle
  10. The Exiles - Christina Baker Kline
  11. When I Come Home Again - Caroline Scott
  12. Running Wolf - Helen Steadman

πŸ“– Twelve books that took me into a world of crime and psychological suspense:

  1. Tell Me Your Secret - Dorothy Koomson
  2. The Liar's Daughter - Clare Allan
  3. The Silent House - Nell Pattison
  4. The Perfect Couple - Jackie Kabler
  5. Pool of Life - Pete Trewin
  6. The Curator - M W Craven
  7. The Graves of Whitechapel - Clare Evans
  8. The Whispering House - Elizabeth Brooks
  9. People of Abandoned Character - Clare Whitfield
  10. The Art Fiasco - Fiona Veitch Smith
  11. A Mother Like You - Ruby Speechley
  12. The Christmas Killer - Alex Lake

πŸ“– Twelve books that took me on extraordinary journeys around the world:

  1. Greece - Scorpions in Corinth - J M Alvey
  2. Ireland - Blood Will be Born - Gary Donnelly
  3. Jerusalem - The Book of Longings - Sue Monk Kidd
  4. Iraq - Red Desert - Paddy Magrane
  5. Germany - Born Survivors - Wendy Holden (NF)
  6. France - That Holiday in France by Rhoda Baxter
  7. Japan - The Phone Box at the Edge of the World - Laura Imai Messina
  8. Italy - The Tuscan Contessa - Dinah Jeffries
  9. America - Where the Crawdad's Sing by Delia Owens
  10. Sri Lanka - Taken in Nuala - Harriet Steel
  11. Russia - City of Ghosts - Ben Creed
  12. French Alps - The Chalet - Catherine Cooper

πŸ“– Twelve Books From Debut Authors :

  1. People of Abandoned Character - Claire Whitfield
  2. This Time Next Year - Sophie Cousens
  3. The Missing Pieces of Nancy Moon - Sarah Steele
  4. The House Party - Mary Grand
  5. The Puritan Princess - Miranda Malin
  6. The Secrets of Creek Cottage - Tina Edwards
  7. The Weight of Small Things - Julie Lancaster
  8. Beach Read - Emily Henry
  9. The Man on the Street - Trevor Wood
  10. The Silent House - Nell Pattison
  11. Saturdays at Noon - Rachel Marks
  12. The Smallest Man - Frances Quinn

πŸ“– Twelve Books I bought for myself :

  1. Where the Crawdads Sing - Delia Owens
  2. Frenchman's Creek - Daphne du Maurier
  3. The King's General - Daphne du Maurier
  4. Before We Were Yours - Lisa Wingate
  5. My One True North - Millie Johnson
  6. The Pull of the Stars - Emma Donoghue
  7. Time for the Dead - Linn Anderson
  8. Dead Inside - Noelle Halton
  9. The List - Carys Jones
  10. Queenie - Candice Carty Williams
  11. Keeper of Secrets - Lynda Stacey
  12. I am Dust - Louise Beech

πŸ“– Twelve Feel-Good Novels :

  1. A Springtime Affair - Katie Fforde
  2. Springtime at Hope Hall - Pam Rhodes
  3. The New Guy - Kathryn Freeman
  4. Summer Strawberries at Swallowtail Bay - Katie Ginger
  5. From Venice with Love - Rosanna Ley
  6. My Map of You - Isabelle Broom
  7. A Walk along the Beach - Debbie Macomber
  8. Beach Hut Surprise - Beach Hut Collective
  9. Love at the Little Wedding Shop - Jane Linfoot
  10. Strictly Come Dating - Kathryn Freeman
  11. Christmas Wishes - Sue Moorcroft
  12. A Surprise Christmas Wedding - Philippa Ashley

πŸ“– Twelve books I am looking forward to reading and reviewing in 2021:

  1. The Island - Ben Macpherson ( January)
  2. All My Lies are True - Dorothy Koomson (January)
  3. The Dark Room - Sam Blake (January)
  4. The Appeal - Janice Hallet ( January)
  5. A Burning - Megha Majumdar (January)
  6. The Art of Falling - Danielle MCloughlin ( January)
  7. The Paris Library - (February)
  8. Call Me Mummy - Tina Baker (February)
  9. The Plague Letters - V L Valentine ( April)
  10. The Drowned City - K J Maitland ( April)
  11. Ariadne - Jennifer Saint (April)
  12. Katharine Parr: The Sixth Wife - Alison Weir (May)







To all the blog readers who visit us every day, Jaffa Timmy and I are so thrilled that you do!

To all these talented authors for sharing the gift of your imagination with me and to the many publishers who continue to support Jaffareadstoo in so many generous ways.

In this difficult year your books have taken me on the most wonderful armchair adventures 😊

Come back tomorrow when I reveal the books I thought were truly special


Tuesday, 29 December 2020

πŸ“– Book Review ~ The Deserter's Daughter by Susanna Bavin

Allison and Busby
2017

My thanks to the author for my copy of this book


1920, Chorlton, Manchester.

As her wedding day approaches, Carrie Jenkins is trying on her dress and eagerly anticipating becoming Mrs Billy Shipton. But all too soon she is reeling from the news that her beloved pa was shot for desertion during the Great War. When Carrie is jilted and the close-knit community turns its back on her, her half-sister Evadne and their mother, the plans Carrie nurtured are destroyed.

Desperate to overcome her private troubles as well as the public humiliation, Carrie accepts the unsettling advances of the well-to-do antiques dealer, Ralph Armstrong. Through Ralph, Evadne meets the aristocratic Alex Larter, who seems to be the answer to her matrimonial ambitions.

But the sisters have chosen men who are not to be trusted and they must face physical danger and personal heartache before they can find the happiness they deserve.

πŸ“– My thoughts..

It should be the happiest time of Carrie Jenkins life as she is about to marry her sweetheart but when devastating news about Carrie's father is revealed it alters the whole trajectory of not just Carrie's life but also that of her mother and older sister. With her marriage plans in disarray Carrie makes a hasty decision to become involved with Ralph Armstrong who offers a solution to her problems but which turns out not to be the safe haven she so desperately desires.

What then follows is an interesting family drama which looks at the stigma which was attached to the families of all those men who were found guilty of desertion during WW1. There is a real sense of shame in this family tragedy not just from the sadness of having once friendly neighbours turn against you but also the bewilderment of having to make life altering decisions when everything around you seems hopeless. 

Th author writes well and brings a real sense of historical accuracy to this character driven story. I enjoyed the northern setting around Manchester which highlights the stern good humour, the strict moral code and the implacable northern grit of the inhabitants of this tough industrial town. The characters are well fleshed out, some are instantly likable, others take a while to get to know and some are, quite frankly, vile from the beginning but this all adds to the rich tapestry of this strong and powerful family saga which kept my attention from start to finish.

This is the first book I have read by this author and I am sure it won't be the last.


About the Author

Susanna Bavin has variously been an librarian, an infant school teacher, a carer and a cook. |she lives in Llandudno in North Wales but her writing is inspired by her Manchester roots.
The Deserter's Daughter was her first novel.






Monday, 28 December 2020

πŸŽ„ Blog Tour ~ The Smuggler's Wife by Evie Grace



πŸŽ„ Thrilled to be the first blog to open today's blog tour stopπŸŽ„


Arrow
31 December 2020
#3 Smuggler's Daughters Trilogy

My thanks to the publishers for my copy of this book
and the invitation to take part in the blog tour


Kent, 1815

Her heart led her to him, but will loyalty be enough to make her stay . . .

When the beautiful but naΓ―ve Grace Lennicker falls for Isaiah Feasey, son of a rival smuggling family and owner of a local tavern, her sisters try to intervene. But as tensions grow, there is another suitor also hoping to win her hand in marriage, the dashing and more favourable Albert Enderby, a young lieutenant in the Revenue.

Grace is unwittingly drawn back into the world of smuggling that her sisters fought hard to leave behind, and as violence erupts, she finds herself unable to stand by, knowing the rival gangs will kill anyone who stands in their way.

When her husband becomes involved, Grace is forced to make a difficult decision - turn him in and risk her life, or stay loyal and risk the lives of those she loves...


My thoughts...

Set in Kent, in the early nineteenth century, this series follows the fortunes of the Lennicker sisters who we have met previously in The Lace Maiden and The Golden Maid and whilst it is perfectly possible to read each story as a stand-alone historical adventure/saga, like all series it is better to read the stories in order as that way you get to know each of the sisters in turn.

The Smuggler’s Wife follows the story of Grace Lennicker, the youngest of the girls, and for whom life is always going to be complicated, especially when she has two very different suitors vying for her attention. Choosing to go with her heart’s desire, Grace soon realises that life with, tavern keeper and general bad boy, Isaiah Feasey, isn’t going to be straightforward, nor do her older sisters approve of her associating with a man who seems to attract nothing but trouble.

What then follows is an exciting, and thoroughly enjoyable, historical adventure which has all the hallmarks of this author’s fine writing. The area around Deal in Kent comes alive and the old phrase of ‘keep your friends close but your enemies closer’ springs to mind especially with the vivid description of what it was like to be constantly in danger, either from creditors demanding money with menaces, or in trying to keep one step ahead of the Revenue.

Grace proves to be a feisty young heroine, I enjoyed getting to know more about her and wanted everything to work out well. It was especially interesting to have snippets of information about what was happening in the lives of the older Lennicker sisters and both Winnie and Louisa have much to say on the subject of Grace’s volatile relationship with Isiah Feasey. Of course, as the title suggests this book has references to the smuggling past of this part of the country and the author describes this free trade, particularly after the conclusion of the Napoleonic Wars when times were hard, with a fine eye for historical detail.

Beautifully written with an air of authenticity, The Smugglers Wife is a fine continuation of this series and an interesting historical saga on its own merits.


About the author

Evie Grace was born in Kent, and one of her earliest memories is of picking cherries with her grandfather who managed a fruit farm near Selling. Holidays spent in the Kent countryside and the stories passed down through her family inspired her to write her Maids of Kent trilogy. Evie now lives in Devon with her partner and dog. She has a grown-up daughter and son. She loves researching the history of the nineteenth century and is very grateful for the invention of the washing machine, having discovered how the Victorians struggled to do their laundry.


Twitter @eviegrace2017

@ArrowPublishing #TheSmugglersWife






Sunday, 27 December 2020

πŸŽ… Christmas Sunday Brunch with Jaffareadstoo ~ Maisie Thomas



On this quiet December Sunday morning why don't you put the kettle on, make your favourite breakfast and settle down for a Festive Sunday Brunch with Jaffareadstoo








πŸŽ… I'm delighted to welcome author, Maisie Thomas to our Christmas Sunday Brunch today πŸŽ…

 


πŸŽ…Welcome, Maisie what favourite food are you bringing to this Christmas Sunday brunch? 

I’ll bring mince pies filled with home-made mincemeat. I make my own every year. You have to cook it very slowly on a low heat and while it’s in the oven, the delicious mixture of fruity and spicy aromas are released. It makes whole house smell of orange and lemons. 


πŸŽ…Would you like a pot of English breakfast tea, a strong Americano, or a celebratory glass of Bucks Fizz?

Bucks Fizz, please. I always have a glass or two of that on Christmas Day and another glass with you will spread the festivities out for a little longer. And don’t worry about me raiding the coffee pot – I hate coffee in any form. If we have a box of chocs, it’s my husband’s job to eat the coffee-centre straight away so that I don’t choose it by mistake. 


πŸŽ…Where shall we eat brunch – around the kitchen table, in the formal dining room, or outside on the patio? 

Around the kitchen table, please. That always feels such a cosy thing to do. 


πŸŽ…Shall we have festive music playing in the background? And if so will you share with us a favourite Christmas song or piece of Christmas music that makes you happy? 

I’ll bring with me my favourite CD of Christmas music, which a compilation of orchestral versions of jolly festive music, such as Deck the Halls, Troika and Sleigh Ride. I love this CD because I used to play it as background music in my classroom while we were making Christmas cards and doing other Christmassy crafts. There’s nowhere more exciting than an infants’ classroom in the run-up to Christmas! This music brings back lots of happy memories. 


πŸŽ…Which of your literary heroes (dead or alive) are joining us for Sunday Brunch today? 

Georgette Heyer, Catherine Cookson, Anya Seton and Eleanor Hibbert (the real name of Jean Plaidy/Victoria Holt/Philippa Carr) will be joining us – four wonderful writers. Victoria Holt’s gothic novels were among the first books “grown-up” books I read when I was in my early teens and I adored them. 


πŸŽ…Which favourite Christmas book will you bring to Sunday Brunch? 

We Wish You a Merry Murder by Valerie Wolzien. I love Christmas stories and this is the most Christmassy I’ve ever come across. It’s full of present-buying, cooking, parties and family stresses – oh yes, and solving a murder mystery at the same time. 







πŸŽ…When you are writing do you still find time to read for pleasure? And is there a book you would like to read but haven’t had time for …yet! 

I love reading. I come from a family of lifelong readers and library-users. I always have two books on the go – one print book and one audio. As for what I haven’t read yet… I read all of Thomas Hardy’s books years ago, except for Far From the Madding Crowd, which somehow or other got left out, so I’ve always meant to read that. 


πŸŽ…What’s the oldest book on your book shelf? 

I have a number of collections of short stories that were published in the 1930s, with titles like The Mammoth Book of Thrillers, Ghosts and Mysteries and A Century of Humour, which is one of a series of A Century of… books. But I think my oldest book is a first edition of The Dolly Dialogues by Anthony Hope from 1894. Not nearly so old is my copy of The Pickwick Papers – it’s a 1953 edition. It belonged to my dad, so it’s very special. 


πŸŽ…Where do you find the inspiration for your novels? 

A lot of the plots simply grow out of the characters themselves – the type of people they are and they way they react to things. The Railway Girls series is set during the Second World War, so I also use history books, especially books of oral history, and get ideas that way. Two or three lines in a book of oral history led to a whole chapter in the third Railway Girls books, which will be published next May. 


πŸŽ…Have you a favourite place to settle down to write and do you find it easier to write in winter or summer? 

In pre-pandemic days, I used to do much of my writing in the public library, where I’d just sit down and get on with work right away. Having to work at home took some getting used to and I still don’t manage the same output as before. If it’s a lovely sunny day, I have a particular place where I settle down near the sea and get on with my scribbling. Winter or summer? I don’t have a preference. Deadlines don’t care what month it is or what the weather’s like! 


πŸŽ…Give us four essential items that a writer absolutely needs? 

I’m sure one of my cats would tell you that a tortie on the lap is an absolute must, though I’m not so sure about that. My four things are: routine, thorough planning, having reference books to hand, and not being interrupted. 


πŸŽ…What can you tell us about your latest novel or your current work in progress? 

I have finished writing the third book in the Railway Girls series. It’s called The Railway Girls in Love. And I’m working on the fourth book. The first three books all had the same viewpoint characters – Joan, Dot and Mabel. In book 4, there are different viewpoint characters. My readers already know these characters from the earlier books, but now they’ll have a chance to see the world through their eyes. 


Maisie's latest novel


Arrow
September 2020


This second instalment of this exciting new saga series shows just how important friendship and love is in a time of uncertainty and change. We pick back up with Dot, Joan and Mabel as the war continues and secrets threaten their budding friendships. Brought together by their work on Manchester’s railways and a duty to help the war effort and those they love fighting overseas, these three amazing women find that with the support and encouragement of each other, they can get through even the most challenging of times.


More about Maisie

Maisie Thomas was born and brought up in Manchester, which provides the location for her Railway Girls novels. She loves writing stories with strong female characters, set in times when women needed determination and vision to make their mark. The Railway Girls series is inspired by her great aunt Jessie, who worked as a railway clerk during the First World War. 

Maisie now lives on the beautiful North Wales coast with her railway enthusiast husband and their two rescue cats. They often enjoy holidays chugging up and down the UK’s heritage steam railways.


Maisie, where can we follow you on social media? 

Twitter @MaisieThomas99

@ArrowPublishing


Thank you for inviting me to Sunday Brunch, Jo. I’ve loved being here. 


Follow us on Twitter @jaffareadstoo #SundayBrunchwithJaffareadstoo







Monday, 21 December 2020

Christmas Greetings...

 





Jaffa, Timmy and I are taking a little break now for a few blog free days



We hope that you all have a safe and happy Christmas





Sunday, 20 December 2020

πŸŽ… Christmas Sunday Brunch with Jaffareadstoo ~ Louise Marley


On this quiet December Sunday morning why don't you put the kettle on, make your favourite breakfast and settle down for a Festive Sunday Brunch with Jaffareadstoo






πŸŽ… I'm delighted to welcome author, Louise Marley to our Christmas Sunday Brunch today πŸŽ…







πŸŽ…Welcome Louise, what favourite food are you bringing to this Christmas Sunday brunch?

Mince pies! I hope that doesn’t sound boring but I do make them myself—including the mincemeat! They are high in fruit and low in sugar—practically no calories at all! 


πŸŽ…Would you like a pot of English breakfast tea, a strong Americano, or a celebratory glass of Bucks Fizz?

I would love an Americano, thank you! 


πŸŽ…Where shall we eat brunch—around the kitchen table, in the formal dining room, or outside on the patio? 

The patio might be a little cold and possibly wet! How about around the kitchen table? 


πŸŽ…Shall we have festive music playing in the background? And if so will you share with us a favourite Christmas song or piece of Christmas music that makes you happy? 

I love Christmas music, which is fortunate because I’ve just spent two years listening to it while I wrote and edited You Make It Feel Like Christmas! I always have music playing while I work and create playlists for each book. 

For a long time my favourite song was All I Want for Christmas is You by Mariah Carey but listening to Christmas music for two years forced me to find new tracks! It’s hard to pick just one, so I’ll say When the Snow Falls Down by Amy Stroup, The Christmas Song by The Raveonettes, and You Make It Feel Like Christmas by Gwen Stefani & Blake Shelton. 


πŸŽ…Which of your literary heroes (dead or alive) are joining us for Sunday Brunch today? 

I have lots of literary heroes but I don’t want to crowd your kitchen! Could I bring Terry Pratchett and Jilly Cooper, for their sense of humour? And perhaps squeeze in Shirley Jackson? She would have been a fascinating person to meet. I’d have lots of questions! 


πŸŽ…Which favourite Christmas book will you bring to Sunday Brunch? 

I love reading Christmas books, particularly romantic comedy and cosy crime. However, my favourite was written by Enid Blyton in 1944 and belonged to my mother. It’s called The Christmas Book and explains all the familiar Christmas traditions. When I was a child I would re-read it every year. 


πŸŽ…When you are writing do you still find time to read for pleasure? And is there a book you would like to read but haven’t had time for …yet! 

I read two books a week and still have a huge ‘to be read’ list because I can’t stop buying more! I loved Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials and bought the first one in his Book of Dust series, La Belle Sauvage, some time ago. I still haven’t had the chance to read it. Maybe this Christmas! 

Penguin Children's and
David Fickling Books
2017



πŸŽ…What’s the oldest book on your book shelf? 

Coincidentally, it’s A Visit from St Nicholas (also known as The Night Before Christmas) by Clement Clarke Moore, published in 1919. 


πŸŽ…Where do you find the inspiration for your novels? 

I tend to have several different ideas that all come together like a jigsaw puzzle. In You Make It Feel Like Christmas I wanted to write about Christmas because I love it so much. I wanted a heroine who loved Christmas too—so much so that she has very definite ideas about how Christmas should be celebrated—and that’s where her trouble begins! I also wanted to write about a house—and a family!—that weren’t perfect. And I wanted to explore what—when it comes right down to it—Christmas is really about. 

πŸŽ…Have you a favourite place to settle down to write and do you find it easier to write in winter or summer?

I am very lucky in that I have my own study! It is a tiny room, with just about room for my desk and a couple of bookcases. I love it. It doesn’t matter what the season is, it has no effect on my writing. Although if I’m too hot or too cold it can interfere with my thought process. 


πŸŽ…When writing to a deadline are you easily distracted and if so how do you bring back focus on your writing? 

My problem is not lack of focus, it’s lack of time! I’m not sure whether I need a Harry Potter style Time Turner or the ability to freeze time completely. If I didn’t have to go to sleep, I’d get so much more done! 


πŸŽ…Give us four essential items that a writer absolutely needs? 

Basically just a pen and paper, but four less tangible things would be: A good imagination (obviously!), patience, a determination to work hard, and an ability to be able to switch off from any distractions—including the Internet! 


πŸŽ…What can you tell us about your latest novel or your current work in progress? 

Television presenter Agatha Holly has built her career on telling viewers how to have the perfect Christmas. 'A Holly Jolly Christmas' has been screened every December for twenty years and her entire family are involved, including her daughter Beth—the unwilling star of a thousand memes and gifs. But Beth has finally had enough of public ridicule. All she’s ever wanted is a traditional family Christmas away from the television cameras. If she can’t persuade her family to change, should she consider celebrating Christmas without them? 


πŸŽ…Louise, where can we follow you on social media? πŸŽ…


Twitter @LouiseMarley 







Louise,t hank you for taking part in Sunday Brunch with Jaffareadstoo. 

Thank you very much for inviting me! Can I tempt you with another mince pie? I think I’ve made too many… 


πŸŽ…Louise's Latest NovelπŸŽ…



The only thing preventing Beth’s perfect family Christmas? Her family!

Television presenter Agatha Holly has built her career on telling viewers how to have the perfect Christmas. 'A Holly Jolly Christmas' has been screened every December for twenty years and her entire family are involved, including her daughter Beth—the unwilling star of a thousand memes and gifs. But Beth has finally had enough of public ridicule. All she’s ever wanted is a traditional family Christmas away from the television cameras. If she can’t persuade her family to change, should she consider celebrating Christmas without them? 



πŸŽ…More about LouiseπŸŽ… 

Louise Marley writes murder mysteries and romantic comedies. She is lucky enough to live in a village where there is a famous library and two ruined castles. (Her husband still thinks they moved there by accident). 

Her first published novel was Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, which was a finalist in Poolbeg's 'Write a Bestseller' competition. She has also written articles for the Irish press and short stories for women's magazines such as Take a Break and My Weekly. Previously, Louise worked as a civilian administrative officer for the police.



 πŸŽ…Thank you for taking part in Sunday Brunch with Jaffareadstoo πŸŽ…

πŸŽ…Thank you for inviting me!πŸŽ…


Follow us on Twitter @jaffareadstoo #SundayBrunchwithJaffareadstoo