Sunday, 6 April 2014

Sunday War Poet....

Rudyard Kipling

(1865-1935)


Rudyard Kipling.jpg


My Boy Jack


“Have you news of my boy Jack?”
Not this tide.
“When d’you think that he’ll come back?”
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

“Has any one else had word of him?”
Not this tide.
For what is sunk will hardly swim,
Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.

“Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?”
None this tide,
Nor any tide,
Except he did not shame his kind —
Not even with that wind blowing, and that tide.

Then hold your head up all the more,
This tide,
And every tide;
Because he was the son you bore,
And gave to that wind blowing and that tide!


Rudyard Kipling was an English novelist and poet. He wrote My Boy Jack after the loss of his beloved son at the Battle of Loos in 1915.

Kipling is best remembered for his short stories and children's tales.




6 comments:

  1. I do find this very moving.....but it is not one that I particularly "like". I think Jack was his only child too, wasn't he?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think Kipling always felt terribly guilty over the lost of his son. Originally John (Jack) was turned down by the Royal Navy because of his poor eyesight but Kipling pulled some strings and got John a commission in the 2nd Battalion , Irish Guards.

      Thanks for your comments Susan, much appreciated .

      Delete
  2. Thanks for these Sunday Poets, I really look forward to reading them. And hearing Kipling's poem spoken was very moving. I think he was a wonderful writer and poet. So thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lucienne,

      Thanks for taking the time to read my Sunday Poets. I am really enjoying tracking down all the different war poems. I agree Kipling was a wonderful writer - and this poem is particularly poignant.

      David Haig reads this one quite beautifully, doesn't he?

      Delete
  3. Such a sad and poignant poem, yet still the pride of a father for his son shines through. This reminds me of a poem I recently read - On My First Sonne by Ben Johnson - not sure of the context but it sprang to mind immediately. Really enjoying this series :)

    Nell at And Nell Writes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for visiting, Nell. I will track down the poem you mentioned.
      Glad you're enjoying my WW1 series of war poems.

      Delete

Thanks for taking the time to comment - Jaffa and I appreciate your interest.